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Posts for: September, 2020

By ARBOR HILLS DENTAL
September 21, 2020
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: porcelain veneers   veneers  

Very few individuals, yes, this includes celebrities with flawless smiles, are born with perfect teeth. In fact, those picture-perfect smiles have, in most cases, been cosmetically improved.

Porcelain veneers are a minimally-invasive and simple treatment our cosmetic dentist, Dr. Angela Toy, here at Arbor Hills Dental in Newberg, OR, utilizes for improving less-than flawless grins. The slim porcelain shells can conceal all kinds of flaws to improve your teeth’s appearance and, in turn, your overall look.

Mask Cosmetic Flaws and Gaps

Fabricated correctly, porcelain veneers will fit over your front teeth’s surfaces to conceal imperfections like gaps, stains, chips, and oddly-shaped teeth. They can be customized to match your real teeth’s color for that perfectly natural look. The porcelain shells can cover one or several of your teeth.

Make Your Smile Bright and White

Professional bleaching is a practical solution for lots of people. However, not all people respond well to bleaching. For instance, if your stains are a result of excess fluoride during childhood or medications, teeth whitening won’t work for those stains.

Porcelain veneers, however, could mask these stains. They’re likewise more resistant to staining than your teeth’s natural enamel, ensuring that they remain whiter for longer. Just make sure to come in for your routine checkups and cleanings with your cosmetic dentist in Newberg, OR, to help prolong the life of your veneers.

Conceal Chips and Cracks

Besides enhancing your smile, porcelain veneers likewise offer extra resilience and strength. If you have a chipped or cracked tooth, veneers can give you an additional protection layer that could help in preventing further damage.

However, it’s vital to note that although they can fix various imperfections, if you have a severely damaged tooth, your cosmetic dentist may recommend a more suitable treatment like a dental implant or crown to improve your affected tooth’s function and appearance.

Get a Straighter Smile Without Orthodontic Treatment

If you have some minor crookedness, you can resolve this without orthodontics. Since porcelain veneers go over your teeth, they can hide minor crookedness and make your teeth look straight. However, if your teeth’s placement impacts your oral health and/or bite, orthodontic treatment may be more appropriate for your needs.

Find Out How Porcelain Veneers Can Help Your Smile. Reach Out to Us

Call (503) 538-2143 to schedule an evaluation with your cosmetic dentist, Dr. Angela Toy, here at Arbor Hills Dental in Newberg, OR.


By Arbor Hills Dental
September 19, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dry mouth  
TakeTheseStepstoAlleviateChronicDryMouth

You might be noticing some changes as you get older: You're getting winded easier and you're wondering why book or magazine print has suddenly shrunk (it didn't). Perhaps you've also noticed your mouth seems drier more often.

It could be a condition called xerostomia, in which your body isn't producing enough saliva. Older people are more prone to it because it's often a side effect of prescription drugs that can inhibit saliva production. Because seniors tend to take more medications than other age groups, xerostomia is a more common problem for them.

Xerostomia isn't a pleasant experience. More importantly, it's hazardous to your oral health. Saliva contains antibodies that fight bacterial infection, and it also neutralizes mouth acid that causes tooth decay. A lack of saliva puts you at greater risk for both tooth decay and gum disease.

Fortunately, there are things you can do to alleviate or ease the effects of xerostomia.

Cut back on spicy foods and caffeinated beverages. Spicy or salty foods can irritate your gum tissues and worsen dry mouth symptoms. Because it's a diuretic, caffeine causes you to lose more fluid, something you can't afford with xerostomia. Cutting back on both will improve your symptoms.

Drink more water. Increasing your daily water intake can help you produce more saliva. It also washes away food particles bacteria feed on and dilutes acid buildup, which can reduce your risk for dental disease.

Talk to your doctor and dentist. If you're taking medications with dry mouth side effects, ask your doctor about other alternatives. You can also ask your dentist about products you can use to boost saliva production.

Practice daily hygiene. Daily hygiene is important for everyone, but especially for those whose saliva flow is sub-par. Brushing and flossing clear away dental plaque, the top cause for dental disease. Along with regular dental visits, this practice can significantly reduce your risk for tooth decay and gum disease.

Taking these steps can help you avoid the discomfort that often accompanies xerostomia. It could also help you prevent diseases that could rob you of your dental health.

If you would like more information on dealing with dry mouth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “10 Tips for Dealing With Dry Mouth.”


By Arbor Hills Dental
September 09, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: toothache  
YourToothacheMightSignalaProblemOtherThaninYourMouth

You expect a decayed tooth, a fracture or a gum infection to be the cause for that toothache causing you grief. Sometimes, though, the answer may be “none of the above”—there's nothing wrong going on in your mouth to cause the pain.

You pain is real—but its source is elsewhere in the body, a situation known as referred pain. It's important to find out the pain's true source to determine what kind of treatment you'll need to alleviate it.

Here are some of the likely candidates for a “toothache” that's not a toothache.

Facial nerves. Tooth pain may be associated with trigeminal neuralgia, a misfiring disorder of the trigeminal nerves that course through either side of the face. The nerve is divided into three branches, two of which are located in the upper face and one in the lower jaw. Because they're interconnected, a problem with one of the branches in other parts of the face could be felt in the branch around the jaw.

Jaw joints. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD) can cause pain in the pair of joints that connect the lower jaw to the skull. The joints can become inflamed due to stress or trauma and the associated muscles begin spasming, causing severe pain. Because of their proximity to the teeth, the pain from the joints can radiate into the dental area and mimic a toothache.

Ear or sinus infections. Both the ears and the maxillary sinus are subject to infections that can cause severe pain and pressure. With the close proximity of both the ears and the sinus to the upper jaw, it's quite possible for pain originating in these structures to be felt within the mouth.

These are only a few of the possibilities that also include migraines, shingles, fibromyalgia and even vitamin deficiencies. As such, your dentist or physician may need to do a little detective work to locate the true cause. But the effort to locate where your mouth pain is actually coming from will help ensure you get the right treatment to give you lasting relief.

If you would like more information on referred tooth pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Referred Pain: When a Toothache Is Not Really a Toothache.”